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    Training new techniques

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    Helen Mackenzie

    Posts : 56
    Join date : 2008-08-20
    Location : Bishops Cleeve

    Training new techniques

    Post by Helen Mackenzie on Thu Aug 21, 2008 8:20 pm

    Can I ask what methods or systems do you use when you are given or learning a new technique? Do you break each movement down into small chunks or do you drill parts of it separately over and over again?

    Thanks HelenX

    Nick Engelen

    Posts : 178
    Join date : 2008-06-14
    Age : 38

    Re: Training new techniques

    Post by Nick Engelen on Thu Aug 21, 2008 8:43 pm

    Hi Helen,

    It depends what kind of technique. Long difficult techniques might be build up to a short technique can be done in one go.

    It can be chunked in say footwork first then the hands then the entire body.
    If you don't understand a technique you can ask but always try to train with the senior clubmembers. What I see is that beginners often try to train with someone that started at the same time instead of making a sprint for the topdog in class.

    Then when you get the technique do it whenever you can without partner.

    It's good to chunk into steps like 1,2, 3 but once you know it it has to become one technique. It's like learning a word you chunk it up into the letters. For example Helen, you say Helen not H-e-l-e-n.

    As you are one of Tony's students I am sure you will be fine.

    Kind Regards,

    Nick Engelen

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    Guest

    Re: Training new techniques

    Post by Guest on Thu Aug 21, 2008 9:10 pm

    Hey Helen.

    If only I had a quid for everytime I have heard someone ask this question.
    I agree with Nick on this one also, It does generally depend on the technique as Nick says, if it is a small one then obviously get the technique nice and slow first, then drill it over and over until you are sick of it then drill it some more for good measure.

    More lengthy techniques can be broken down as stated, footwork, body mechanics, hand positioning, etc etc. but as long as you keep your form in check as you are being taught, there is no reason why you cant drill part of the technique first to get the feel, then combine the other parts of it, as long as there is not a big gap in training the technique. I have seen this done and it has worked well for some people, while others struggle to put both parts together. we all learn in different ways.

    Techniques are invariably broken down into sub components so by doing each one slow and steady, and working up to the whole technique you will make sure you develop that muscle memory. then fast or slow it will be with you for life.

    As nick says, you are training with two of the best guys I know.
    Stick with it and you wont go far wrong.

    Regards
    Craig
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    Joe Hubbard

    Posts : 95
    Join date : 2008-08-20
    Location : London

    Re: Training new techniques

    Post by Joe Hubbard on Sat Aug 23, 2008 11:07 am

    Run every technique through this filter:

    1. Solo, Command and Mastery in the air.
    2. Solo, Command and Mastery against objects- heavy bag, B.O.B., wooden dummy, etc.
    3. Partner Training against objects: focus mitts, shields, training suits
    4. Cooperative partner training drills
    5. Uncooperative partner training drills
    6. Sparring to Combat Scenarios

    Then run it through this filter:

    Learn, practice, absorb, functionalize and maintain


    Out

    Joe
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    Helen Mackenzie

    Posts : 56
    Join date : 2008-08-20
    Location : Bishops Cleeve

    Re: Training new techniques

    Post by Helen Mackenzie on Mon Aug 25, 2008 9:38 pm

    Thank you guys for your comprehensive answers. I am being trained by two of the best, Tony T and Al M not to mentione the other instructors but I also like to hear what you have to say. Everyone has a different way of doing things. Any more feed back is welcomed as I am at the start of this fantastic journey and have a long way to go and learning never stops. Thank you. X scratch


    Last edited by Helen Mackenzie on Tue Aug 26, 2008 12:27 am; edited 1 time in total
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    Michael W Wright

    Posts : 128
    Join date : 2008-08-04
    Location : Glasgow/London

    Re: Training new techniques

    Post by Michael W Wright on Mon Aug 25, 2008 11:26 pm

    Hi Helen,

    Every technique presented to you can be developed, refined and tested against an alive, resisting opponent - from day one.

    You can take a 3, 5, 7, 10 step or whatever approach to the functionalisation of your learning - or you can start it one day one. Months of drilling in the air, on the pads, with a partner who is feeding you exactly the right energy you ask for... is all very nice, and I'm sure you will look great. But when you go up against an alive, resisting opponent you will realise that all of the attributes you really need to land that technique could have started from day one.

    I'll give you one simple example - the jab. I could have you jabbing the air for a few weeks, then the pads for a few months, then put some neat little drills together which have nothing to do with landing a jab but hey they sure look cool, and so on it goes. Or, once I have shown you the simple mechanics, I would put a glove on you, put a headguard on me, and we would move around. Your goal? To score a hit with that jab. Whats the purpose of a jab? To score with. Thats why they call it sports-specific training. Over the course of our rounds I would increase my movement and evasiveness and also put more pressure on you. The more pressure I put on you the more I guarantee your jab will improve, when someone is trying to hit you, you will try 10 times as hard to hit them back.

    At the end of our first session you will have been moving around with an alive, challenging, resisiting opponent and scored maybe 20 or 30 genuine jabs. That, to me, is a good jab. People will say it will be a rubbish jab, it won't have the correct form etc. A rubbish jab is one that doesn't hit, a good jab is one that does, and that is the bottom line. From there, our goal is to refine what you are doing, because of course good technique is important. But in my opinion and experience, its is a far more effective approach to take the functional and train to perfect it, as opposed to taking perfection and trying to functionalise it.

    That's why my concept is "learn to fight and fight to learn", the above is an example of what that means.

    Best of luck.

    MW
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    Phil Brady

    Posts : 175
    Join date : 2008-08-18

    Re: Training new techniques

    Post by Phil Brady on Tue Aug 26, 2008 12:36 am

    Sound advice there Michael.

    Phil

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